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when to use present perfect

erstellt am: 27.11.2020 | von: | Kategorie(n): Allgemein

Examples I have been a teacher for more than ten years. We often use for and since with perfect tenses:. Pour les actions qui ont commencé dans le passé et qui se continuent dans le présent, on utilise le PRESENT PERFECT, par opposition au prétérit qui concerne des actions qui sont terminées. Present Perfect and Present Perfect Continuous, Simple Past, Present Perfect, and Past Perfect, Present Perfect, Past Perfect, Present Perfect Continuous, and Past Perfect Continuous, Present and Past Tenses with Non-Continuous Verbs, She graduated from university less than three years ago. We often use the present perfect to say that an action which we expected has not happened. When we use the present perfect it means that something has happened at some point in our lives before now. Please contact me if you have any questions or comments. We use the present perfect to say that an action happened at an unspecified time before now. The present perfect tense is used to describe something that happened in the past, but the exact time it happened is not important. We use the present perfect to say that an action happened at an unspecified time before now. Get more Perfect English Grammar with our courses. The use of present perfect and past perfect is not related to the adverb; it is related to the context and the action expressed by the verb. I have never heard that we could use "when" with Perfect tenses especially with Present Perfect before. The concept of "unspecified time" can be very confusing to English learners. For example, we use the present perfect tense if something started in the past and is still true or still describes the current situation. You cannot mention a specific time. Negatives are made with not. The present perfect is most frequently used to talk about experiences or changes that have taken place, but there are other less common uses as well. Is it correct? But today I have found one example: When has your brother visited you? Where's John? The present perfect is formed using has/have + past participle. Although the above use of present perfect is normally limited to non-continuous verbs and non-continuous uses of mixed verbs, the words "live," "work," "teach," and "study" are sometimes used in this way even though they are NOT non-continuous verbs. We CAN use the present perfect with unspecific expressions such as: ever, never, once, many … Connection with past: the situation started in the past. How long have you been at this school? She hasn’t hiked that trail before. It has a relationship with the present. I've already moved house twice this year! We haven't seen Janine since Friday. I'm Seonaid and I hope you like the website. Sometimes we can use the past simple here, especially in US English. This started in the past and is not finished) I have loved chocolate since I was 3 years old. We often use the present perfect to talk about change that has happened over a period of time. Need more practice? It is best to associate present perfect with the following topics: You can use the present perfect to describe your experience. Julie has gone to Mexico (now she's in Mexico). She's hurt her leg (so she can't play tennis today). Questions are indicated by inverting the subject and has/have. Present Perfect. Where is the best place you have ever been? The Mayor has announced a new plan for the railways. Read more about the difference between the present perfect simple and the present perfect continuous here. For information on how to make the present perfect, click here. The present perfect is NOT used to describe a specific event. Connection with present: the situation continues in the present. Read more about the difference between the present perfect and the past simple here. (C'est fini, je suis revenu en France.) We use the present perfect to describe an unfinished action with ‘Since’ and ‘For’. What sports have you played? You CANNOT use the present perfect with specific time expressions such as: yesterday, one year ago, last week, when I was a child, when I lived in Japan, at that moment, that day, one day, etc. We often use the present perfect to talk about something that happened in the recent past, but that is still true or important now. Present perfect use We normally use the present perfect to talk about past events that have a connexion with the present; for example, news or past experiences. I have lived here for 3 years. Check the grammar chart below: Recent events and news Use #1: Indefinite Time. When describing an action that happened at an indefinite time in the past. The total time of me living here is 3 years till now. The past perfect describes an action in the past with a result, effect or relevance later in the past. I've liked chocolate since I was a child. When to use the Present perfect The Present Perfect is used to indicate a link between the present and the past. We can also use the present perfect to talk about situations that started in the past, but which are still true in the present. He's gone to the shops (he's at the shops now). Ask your group if they have seen some of your favorite movies. The present perfect is formed from the present tense of the verb have and the past participle of a verb. She has been to school today (but now she's back at home). We CAN use the present perfect with unspecific expressions such as: ever, never, once, many times, several times, before, so far, already, yet, etc. I have eaten at this restaurant before. Where have you traveled? For and Since with Present Perfect tense. I've lost my keys (so I can't get into my house). Tip! I know that it carries a sense of continuity from the past, but many times in news articles, I come across sentences with present perfect tense that do not have to do anything with continuity. non-continuous verbs and non-continuous uses of What’s the craziest thing you have ever done? Welcome! It is like saying, "I have the experience of..." You can also use this tense to say that you have never had a certain experience. In Year 3, they are be expected to use the present perfect form of verbs instead of the simple past (for example: 'He has gone on holiday' rather than 'He went on holiday'). "For five minutes," "for two weeks," and "since Tuesday" are all durations which can be used with the present perfect. We often use since and for to say how long the action has lasted. You CANNOT use the present perfect with specific time expressions such as: yesterday, one year ago, last week, when I was a child, when I lived in Japan, at that moment, that day, one day, etc. I've been to Paris (in my life, but now I'm in London, where I live). 1. We use the Present Perfect Tense to talk about an action which started in the past and continuous up to now. With We can do this with expressions such as: in the last week, in the last year, this week, this month, so far, up to now, etc. She. We use Past Simple when we are talking about the time. I have seen it at a native resource. present-perfect perfect-constructions. Have you ever shot a gun? Sometimes, we want to limit the time we are looking in for an experience. Have you ever ridden an animal? We often use the present perfect to list the accomplishments of individuals and humanity. "Last year" means the year before now, and it is considered a specific time which requires simple past. I have done my homework = I finished my homework in the past. Since it’s a present tense, the result should be in the present. It is not considered a specific time, so it requires present perfect. 4: A finished action with a result in the present (focus on result). Use the present perfect tense when you want to emphasize the result of an action. When do we use the Present Perfect? Read on for detailed descriptions, examples, and present perfect exercises. He has hiked on that trail in the past. Using the present perfect suggests that we are still waiting for the action to happen. The exact time is not important. Have you ever drastically changed your hair style or clothing style in a short time? Result of an action in the past is important in the present (It is not important when this action happened. "In the last year" means from 365 days ago until now. mixed verbs, we use the present perfect to show that something started in the past and has continued up until now. The present perfect describes an action in the past with a present result, effect or relevance. Remember, the exact time the action happened is not important. The time of the action is before now but not specified, and we are often more interested in the result than in the action itself. J'ai habité à Londres en 1998. The Present Perfect is not easy to understand for ESL learners. We use the present perfect: for something that started in the past and continues in the present : They've gone to Japan for three weeks (now they're in Japan). We use ‘since’ with a fixed time in the past (2015, 5th May, last year), and we use ‘for’ with a period of time (5 hours, six months, ten years,). I lived in London in 1998. The present perfect is a verb tense which is used to show that an action has taken place once or many times before now. We also use the present perfect to talk about several different actions which have occurred in the past at different times. "Last year" and "in the last year" are very different in meaning. The exact time is not important. The examples below show the placement for grammar adverbs such as: always, only, never, ever, still, just, etc. They've missed the bus (so they will be late). (I started living here 3 years ago in the past and I still live here now. When to use present perfect tense has always been confusing for me. I have been here once. It is not important at what exact time, only that it is now done. It is a combination of past and present. We use for to talk about a period of time: five minutes, two weeks, six years; We use since to talk about a point in past time: 9 o'clock, 1st January, Monday An actions in the past has something to do with the present. Present perfect suggests the process is not complete and more actions are possible. Children in Year 5 and Year 6 will be taught about the present perfect and past perfect tenses , because it is possible a question on them will arise in the Year 6 Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling test.

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